What Type of Learner is Your Child?

We know that all children learn differently, but did you know that there are four (possibly even more) distinct different learning styles? In today's guest post we discuss the four main types of learners to help you identify which category your child falls into. Once you figure that part out, then you can aim to specifically teach them or guide them with their learning in the way they learn best, thereby giving them the best possibly outcome. 

How to Find Your Child’s Learning Style

When it comes to helping your child with their learning at home, it can be difficult to find the right way to teach according to the types of learning. There are different learning styles and many parents don’t know what style their child prefers. It’s important to be aware of your child’s learning style to maximize your time and efficiency of teaching at home.

The Four Types of Learners

The four learning styles were developed by Neil Fleming, a New Zealand teacher and researcher. Fleming created a popular theory, the VARK model, which focused on how students preferred to learn in order to make learning more effective. The four types of learning are Visual, Auditory, Reading and Writing, and Kinaesthetic.

Visual Learners

Visual learners do best when seeing the information mapped out. A visual learner does well with charts and diagrams. If your child is often doodling or drawing charts while he studies and plays, he’s probably a visual learner. When tested, a visual learner will recall images that they’ve use to remember information.
  • Resources to help your visual learner: Keep a whiteboard in your home or classroom so that you can create mind-maps and draw graphs. You can find plenty of free printable charts and diagrams online. To help your child study, create flashcards to review the information taught that week.

Auditory Learners

Auditory learners like to speak out loud about the concepts they’re learning or hear their lessons. Your child is likely an auditory learner if you hear them talking to themselves, reading out loud, or repeating phrases they’ve heard.
  • Resources to help your auditory learner: Have your child read a lesson out loud or create rhymes about the concepts they’ve learned. You can also utilize an educational podcast so they can listen and learn more about what you’ve taught them.

Reading and Writing Learners

Reading and writing learners learn best when they (you guessed it) read and write. If your child writes out lists and is a bookworm, you’ve got a reading and writing learner on your hands.
  • Resources to help your reading and writing learner: Find a book that goes along with your lesson to give to your child to help them learn further. At the end of each day, have your child write out what they’ve learned in their notebook, and they can study by rewriting those notes later.

Kinaesthetic Learners

Kinesthetic learners are hands-on learners; they retain information best when they can use their hands to learn.
  • Resources to help your kinesthetic learner: You can easily substitute a lesson by watching an educational homeschool movie so your child can learn about a subject by seeing the concepts illustrated through video. Or try incorporating learning blocks or a hands-on experiment into your day.

We could delve so much deeper into this topic by examining how and where the child learns best. Do they prefer to be out doors, do they prefer to work on the floor rather than at a desk, do they need to take their time in order to complete a task, or do they need to be challenged? Do they respond a certain way to sensory input? Do they like to work alone? Do they like to collaborate with others?

I think I'd be placing Miss M between the reading/writing and visual categories. She always has a pencil in her hand, loves colouring and drawing, and enjoys practising writing letters and words - but prefers to copy them (or sometimes I'll tell her the letters and she'll write them down). But then again we are in the very early stages of her school so I'm sure more about her learning style will evolve as time goes on. 

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